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Sorbus hupehensis 'Obtusa' - October 9th Pink Berries Mountain Ash - Rowan Tree


This pink berried tree is well suited to all but the smallest of gardens. Small tree - Mountain Ash, but with pink berries that are held well into the winter.

The slightly upright habit of the head of this Mountain Ash will make it suitable for many gardens. The foliage canopy which is an unusual blue green or steely colour is not dense so allows for sunlight to filter through and is not too demanding of soil moisture, so suitable for underplanting with shrubs, perennials or a range of flowering bulbs. It is also a good partner for underplanting with winter flowering heathers.

You will be rewarded by red foliage in the autumn, then the green white berries will gradually turn to pink that hold well into the winter - even to Christmas Day.

Sorbus huphensis - Pink berried Mountain Ash Details and information about Sorbus hupehensis

Enjoys full sunshine, but will also thrive in dry woodland setting - once established. Most Sorbus - including this one - are happy in dry soils, so withstand rocky and sandy soils, together with silt soils in a woodland situation.

Sorbus hupehensis var obtusa is a slow growing tree at first but then developing faster after 6 - 8 years. It is happy to attain 8 metres in height with a lesser spread - especially as a younger pyramidal tree, later spreading.

Pruning Sorbus hupehensis

This Rowan can be pruned at any time of the year, but best in late winter if you want flower/berry crop for the following year. Pruning to formal shape or simply restricting size are all options. Summer pruning will remove the flowering wood and hence pink berries for that year.

Flowers in early summer are creamy white, which contrast well with the grey green foliage. The berries form early in autumn and give good colour along with the red and orange autumn foliage.

It sets its own seed in various positions, but seed/berries can be harvested and sown as soon as ripe in a coldframe. Overwintered cold, the seedlings will emerge in the spring and can be selected for good foliage colour. However, they will require 5-8 years growth before flower and berries show.

Sorbus hupehensis is normally budded onto a rootstock for standard trees, but sown seedlings can be persuaded to branch out at low level for an interesting multi-stem effect.

As with other members of the Rosacea family such as Pyracantha, they can sometimes be affected by fireblight. The main pests are aphids, though other foliage spoiling bugs also settle from time to time, but doing no lasting damage. 

 



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